In his book “A Universe from Nothing” (Free Press, January 10,1012)  Lawrence M. Krauss (American theoretical physicist and cosmologist and Foundation Professor of the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University) defines nothing as the absence of particulate matter. It does not, however, rule out the existence of quantum fields. Krauss gives no explanation as to where quantum fields come from or why they should behave as they do.  His theory presupposes the existence of a quantum field and certain predictable quantum laws.

David Albert, professor of philosophy at Columbia, put it well when, in his critique of Krauss’s book, he stated:

“The fact that some arrangements of fields happen to correspond to the existence of particles and some don’t is not a whit more mysterious than the fact that some of the possible arrangements of my fingers happen to correspond to the existence of a fist and some don’t. And the fact that particles can pop in and out of existence, over time, as those fields rearrange themselves, is not a whit more mysterious than the fact that fists can pop in and out of existence, over time, as my fingers rearrange themselves. And none of these poppings — if you look at them aright — amount to anything even remotely in the neighborhood of a creation from nothing.” [1]

[1] http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/25/books/review/a-universe-from-nothing-by-lawrence-m-krauss.html?_r=3& Accessed 7/18/2015